Initial Training

The need for training cannot be overemphasized!  It is the first step toward increasing awareness and developing an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of available equipment. Initial training of the safety committee by a competent person is needed to ensure that the fall hazard analysis is properly performed. Then, supervisors or lead persons can be trained as competent persons, receiving instruction in fall protection principles, techniques and equipment performance.  The “training of the trainers” forms the basis of an in-house team that can provide live practice sessions.  Ongoing training is as critical as the initial overview. Periodic refresher instruction for competent person trainers and authorized persons, who are end-users of fall protection procedures and equipment, can serve to reinforce proper proper equipment use and care, as well as provide an opportunity to review new technology.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 438.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Confined Space Rescue

Although some confined spaces are not appropriate for tripod use due to the size of their opening or to workplace geometry, lifelines and winches can be used, along with a variety of davits and brackets suited to the application, and appropriately designed into the workplace.

A mixture of rope rescue equipment coming from mountaineering, fire-rescue, and safety equipment manufacturers, needs clarification of its purpose in general industry and construction.

See “Introduction Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 362.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Harness Design and Fit

It is also important to note that harness designs should keep the back D-ring high on the back between the shoulder blades during use.  Likewise, chest straps should remain high and taut and above the breast line. D-rings lower than midback and chest straps lower than the solar plexis could result in fall-out if a head first fall occurs.

Under no circumstances should any user punch extra holes in a harness leg strap or reduce it from its manfactured length.  Moreover, if the user can only pull the webbing through the buckle to the first grommet, than a larger belt should be requested.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 202.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Wire Rope Systems

Wire-rope systems should be considered where accidental collisions with crane-suspended loads are foreseeable.  Bypass of intermediate supports, using the split-eyebolt concept, can be used in construction industry applications.  Automatic roll-by or slide-by devices can be used in general industry applications.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 242.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

The Problem with a Tie-Off Concept

The “tie-off” concept is the idea that fall arrest equipment is provided to a worker and the decision of where to anchor that equipment is left up to the worker to determine while moving about during the course of the work.  This situation is frequently encountered during construction activities where the workplace is constantly changing and proper fall protection methods are not identified at each stage of the work. The tie-off concept is often implemented by employers who want to appear as if they are in compliance with worker safety regulations, and frequently leads to a false sense of security which results in an even more hazardous workplace.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 93.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Who Needs Fall Protection?

Ultimately, the owner (as principal) is responsible for limiting or excluding fall hazards from his or her property. Both reputation and pocketbook are at stake.  While the knowledgeable owner may employ architects and engineering consultants to advise about the construction of a building or structure, the owner must clearly require state-of-the-art, designed, safety features such as parapets, guardrails, and permanent anchorages whenever possible, both for contractor employees and for his or her own workers, and foreseeable access accommodation following construction.  See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 74.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Welcome to Our Improved Website!!

EFSS has recently completed an overhaul of our entire website.  In addition to an exciting new look, www.FallSafety.com is now easier to navigate and offers even more information and resources.  Please continue to visit us weekly for fall protection news items  and tips here, at Posts.  And don’t worry, all previous “What’s New” articles remain available at a link under the Learning Center tab and now can be sorted by topic/category.

We hope you continue to turn to www.FallSafety.com as your fall protection information resource and that you continue to turn to EFSS for all your fall protection needs.