Category Archives: Anchorage Points

Anchorage Load

Unless the fall event occurs directly underneath the horizontal lifeline, additional lateral loadings will be produced in the anchorages due to offset from the lifeline centerline. The magnitude of these forces is directly related to the offset distance and should be set equal to the maximum vertical load encountered in the line for the total number of workers on the system.  This  load shall be applied in either direction at the end anchorage for analysis and design purposes.

Termination hardware and other accessories also should be checked against the anchorage load  to be certain that the entire fall arrest system meets OSHA requirements.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 301.

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Anchorage Structures

Ladder rungs or steps, and guardrails or railings of any kind, should not be used for fall arrest anchorages unless they are designed and  labeled specifically for that purpose.  Steel members should be used for anchorage-point structures whenever possible.  Masonry fittings can be suitable when used with through-bolts and plate washers.  Expanded anchor bolts should  be specified by a registered professional engineer.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” Appendix C page 514.

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Cable System Anchorages

Cable systems used for anchorages around buildings or structures on the roof should be made of stainless steel, with fittings attached according to the wire-rope manufacturer’s instructions or standard rigging handbooks.  Cable systems used for anchorages should be designed, installed and tested by a licensed professional engineer experienced in such design, prior to being used for the attachment of suspension or fall arrest lines.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 346.

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Anchorage Point Independence

Are anchorage points independent?  The independence of each anchor point from the main work-positioning anchor support is an important principle.  Where tripods or the building or structure itself are concerned, the question to address is, what kind of failure would likely produce an injury? Anchor-point design should address all predictable scenarios.

Is the fall protection system engineered?  An engineered system may permit the lifelines for several workers to be combined, as long as they are separate from the main work-positioning support.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 275.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Guardrails as Anchorage Points

Do not use guardrails as anchorage points for fall arrest equipment unless a structural engineer approves them for that specific purpose.  There must be an engineering drawing that indicates which specific locations are suitable as anchorage points; what equipment, by rating, may be used; and how that equipment is to be attached.  Anchorage points should be labeled as such.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 162.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!