Category Archives: Equipment Maintenance

Equipment Use

The primary rule is to apply fall protection when the height hazard exceeds a reasonable figure of a few feet – or at any height, if continued exposure is not preventable. The responsibility of the equipment vendor to educate an end user is limited by the extent that the customer (i.e., the end user’s employer) has a bona fide no-fall policy rather than a tie-off policy, which is common among employers.  It also depends upon the manufacturer’s instructions, labeling, and product literature, and whether the employer and employees follow these items for reasonably foreseeable or permitted uses.  Workers must be provided with, and be required to read and understand, product instructions and labeling on fall arrest equipment.

See “Introduction to Fall Production, 4th Edition” page 76.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Connecting Hardware

The choice of snaphooks to link rope-grab components is a vital safety matter.  Only instructions from the manufacturer of the rope grab should be followed to ensure  the hardware is compatible.  No other snaphooks should  be  used to avoide potential roll-out or burst-out.  Other parts of this book address the problems of mixing and matching and misuse.  All snaphooks should be of self-locking design, maintained in optimum operating condition, and discarded if they are jammed or damaged.

If a manufacturer’s snaphook instructions for use and inspection are not crystal clear, a new manufacturer should be sought.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 236.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Harness Maintenance

Under no circumstances should any user punch extra holes in a harness leg strap or reduce it from its manufactured length.  Moreover, if the user can only pull the webbing through the buckle to the first grommet, then a larger belt should be requested.

Note that friction buckles can loosen over time unless webbings remain taut.  Tongue buckles can come undone if excess webbing is not held securely due to snagging.  In addition, tongue buckles can uncouple if they are loose (especially on harnesses).  Therefore users must make sure they inspect their harnesses closely prior to each use.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” pages 202-203.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Unless the metal has a large enough cross section as judged by a fall protection Qualifed Person, every steel part should be coated with zinc to protect it from salt, air, or other common corrosion and to prolong its useful service life.  Because of the possibility of chemical reactions causing corrosion, aluminum parts should be anodized if the parts may come into contact with steel.

Stain-less steel cables, springs, and other critical parts are favored over regular steel parts, but many zinc-aluminum alloys also can work, depending on the salinity, frequency, and duration of exposure.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 257.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!