Category Archives: Rescue

Fall-Rescue Planning

It is important to point out that the Fall Protection Code was not written for professional rescuers, such as fire, police and ambulance personnel.  The standards were developed for PFAS users and manufacturers.  While rope rescue by professional rescuers may be the last resort after other rescue means are considered and/or tried and rejected, Z359 standards are written for equipment users as planned rescuers.  Therefore, the emphasis is placed on planning for emergencies as part of the overall fall protection program.  It is important, however, that the rescuers be trained in the latest treatment methods for suspension intolerance.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 460.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Rescue Devices

It should be noted that a manually operated mechanical device could  be utilized optimally at a lift rate of 10 to 20 feet per minute under demonstration conditions.  Remember that the object of the retrieval process is to extricate the worker within 4 minutes, the rule-of-thumb limit for the onset of brain damage from oxygen deprivation.  Therefore, when manually powered hoists are used to provide access from more than a 50-foot depth, a pneumatic operation should be the primary lifting force.  Another factor in the 50-foot limit is the static, muscle work duration for upper-body cranking, set at approximately 30 pounds when non-stop for several minutes (5:1 ratio with 12-inch lever arm).

See “Introduction to Fall Protection,4th Edition” page 370.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Controlled Descent

There is no need to risk prolonged suspension after a fall arrest when it is possible to use an automatic controlled-descent system.  Rather than using equipment that arrests a fall but also could create a need for a difficult and costly high-level rescue, workers should use a lifeline system that automatically lowers them at a constant rate following a fall – either immediately or under rescur control, whichever is appropriate.  This is especially adventageous for external applications without obstructions below and for large confined spaces with a lower (bottom) means of egress, such as a generating or recovery boiler.  Postfall analysis is essential to solving such problems completely; often it indicates the need to substitute controlled descent systems.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 212.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Confined Space Rescue

Although some confined spaces are not appropriate for tripod use due to the size of their opening or to workplace geometry, lifelines and winches can be used, along with a variety of davits and brackets suited to the application, and appropriately designed into the workplace.

A mixture of rope rescue equipment coming from mountaineering, fire-rescue, and safety equipment manufacturers, needs clarification of its purpose in general industry and construction.

See “Introduction Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 362.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!