Category Archives: FP systems, programs

Temporary FP Systems

Although double-lanyard systems remain a seemingly obvious answer for moving horizontally on many present structures without the provision of horizontal lifelines, their use is cumbersome.  An interesting variant used in Japan employs a simpler system that includes a keybox attached to the worker’s belt.  One lanyard key is inserted and remains attached until a second lanyard key is inserted in another opening.  This action ejects the first lanyard key and allows unhindered transfer past obstructions or supports while ensuring continuous protection.

See “Introduction to Fall Protecton, 4th Edition” page 242.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

First Worker Up Fall Protection

Rigging a first-worker-up fall protection system generally follows a pre-determined sequence of steps:

  • To identify a suitable anchor point;
  • To attach a temporary anchorage connecting component, such as an anchor strap, using a remote connecting device;
  • To attach the connecting lanyard or self-retracting lanyard of the personal fall arrest system to the temporary anchorage connector;
  • To connect the lanyard or self-retracting lanyard to the body support harness; and
  • To verify that all conncections are secure before ascending.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 319.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Fall Protection System Components

Both the employer and employee should realize that components of a fall protection system may not be interchangeable.  For instance, if a commodity-grade rope is used for a lifeline, the authorizing authority must be certain that is the correct diameter and has the test strength for use with a specific rope-grab device on a prolonged basis.

Components of a fall arrest system should note be substituted or changed unless fully evaluated and tested by a qualified person or the equipment manufacturer.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” pages 253-254.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Incident Investigation

In the case of a fall or near-miss incident, the fall protection administrator should appoint a competent or qualified person to conduct an incident investigation.  The investigation will help determine if the fall protection program has established the appropriate control method for a given hazard, if the training is adequate, and what improvements are needed to ensure such an incident does not reoccur.

Systems of root-cause analysis help identify the underlying causes of incidents and are valuable for determining what corrective measure should be taken as a result of hte lessons learned. Many times, the result of an incident investigation is that worker error is identified as  the main contributing factor. When root-cause analysis is used, multiple underlying causes are usually uncovered.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 406.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Fall Protection Systems

It is best to integrate fall protection within a structure at the time the structure itself is designed. In some cases, the choice of manufactured system components, such as pulleys, trolleys, and other devices, may reduce the need for basic engineering. The expensive testing you need may have already been conducted and is often available from the manufacturer.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 290.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Fall Arrest vs. Fall Restraint

Fall arrest is designed to catch a person once he or she falls, whereas restraint systems are designed to keep the free fall from occurring in the first place.  A restraint is intended to be a leash, reasonably preventing access to a fall-hazard zone.  In practice, this is extremely difficult, especially if the system is moved.  It is far better to treat it as a fall arrest system meeting fall arrest requirements.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 209.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!

Wire Rope Systems

Wire-rope systems should be considered where accidental collisions with crane-suspended loads are foreseeable.  Bypass of intermediate supports, using the split-eyebolt concept, can be used in construction industry applications.  Automatic roll-by or slide-by devices can be used in general industry applications.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 242.

Order your copy of “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” today.  This invaluable resource will take you from the structure design stage to post construction maintenance. Click to find out more!