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Tip of the Week No. 249 – 06/15/09 – Aerial Lifts


Aerial lifts are mobile work platforms used by personnel for access and work at heights. The work is typically done over the side of platforms, rather than over-head, because it is easiest to work at waist-to-chest level.
Frequently, the work involves pulling, stretching, and leaning over the edge. Some models can replace ladder stands and have a material-handling area.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 115.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 245 – 05/11/09 – Scissor Lifts


Scissors lift manufacturers, recognizing that workers may use the mid-railings as a ladder rung to reach up and in between an obstruction, may decide that a grating or mesh could be installed to limit this fall-exposure tendency.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 63.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 220 – 09/22/08 – Platforms & Aerial Lifts


When these platforms are used for work positioning, fall protection is always needed because workers tend to overreach, which can lead to a fall. Alternatively, workers can be thrown (slingshot) from the bucket due to unforeseen impacts. Aerial lifts and other platforms are sometimes stabilized by applying forces to the platform railings under a truss or next to an exit point. This can lead to tipping or weakening of the platform attachments.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection,3rd Edition” page 244.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 142 – 01/01/07 – Aerial Lifts


Aerial lifts are mobile work platforms used by personal for access and work at heights. The work typically is done over the side of platforms, rather than overhead, because it is easiest to work at waist-to-chest level.
Frequently, the work involves pulling, stretching and leaning over the edge. Some models can replace ladder stands and have a material-handling area.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 115.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.
A Happy and Safe New Year to all our friends and customers!!


Tip of the Week No. 59 A – 02/21/05 – Aerial Lifts


The following are some potential fall hazards related to aerial lifts:
1. Ejection by vehicle collision or springboard action if a wheel drops into a pothole or its equivalent.
2. Falling over the side due to overreaching.
3. Climbing (or sitting) on guardrails.
4. Climbing out of a bucket or transferring to a structure.
5. Platform failure caused by the bucket tipping or boom-control failure.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 118.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 60 – 03/07/05 – Aerial Lifts


SAFETY RULES FOR AERIAL LIFTS:
1. Operators must have an effective procedure for leaving the platform when elevated.
2. The anchor point should be at the same height as the operator’s harness D-ring. The lanyard in most designs should be no more than 4 feet long.
3. Anchor points should be capable of withstanding twice the maximum arrest force of the fall arrest device to avoid the possibility of tip-over. Unauthorized anchor points must not be used.
4. Never use the midrail as a step.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 117.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 49 – 12/06/04 – Aerial Lift Safety


The following story appears in the November/December 2004 issue of Contractor Tools and Supplies Magazine (print and Internet versions).

In the article Dr. J. Nigel Ellis provides his insight on aerial lift fall protection issues. Dr. Ellis states, “Every OSHA regulation is written because of an injury incident.”

To read the complete article go to Contractor Tools and Supplies Aerial Lift Article.

To find out more about fall protection in general see Dr.Ellis’ book “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition”.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Safety News Item – 10/29/04 – Bucket Truck Death


A construction worker doing sandblasting and painting work on an overpass on I-95 in Wilmington, DE was killed when a passing truck hit the high reach basket truck he was in, hurling him to the road below.

The accident occurred at 12:30 am in a well lit construction zone. An investigation into whether the speed of the passing rig played a part in the accident is pending.
There was no immediate evidence that any fall protection equipment was being used.


Tip of the week No. 32 – 07/19/04. Basketcages.


Basketcage protection consists of metal hoops installed around fixed ladders, according to an OSHA requirement (1910.27). This arrangement offers the advantage of one-time installation, low maintenance, and little or no training requirements. ANSI A14.3-1992 permits climbing protection systems to be used with cages for more safety. This becomes positive protection.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 248.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 14 – 03/15/04. Platforms.


Use of suspended work platforms, includidng boatswain’s chairs, always requires fall protection.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 95.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 12 – 03/01/04. Scissors lift.


Scissors lift manufacturers, recognizing that workers may use the mid-railings as a ladder rung to reach up and in between an obstruction, may decide that a grating or mesh could be installed to limit this fall-exposure tendency.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 63.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Aerial Lift Falling Protection:


OSHA status: Belts are OK in truck-mounted railed aerial platforms provided a free fall is limited to two feet. Beyond two foot exposure, harnesses are required. OSHA wording in 1910 and 1926 still relates to safety belts and lanyards for these types of lift and not others. Why? Because the original objective was to retain a worker inside the bucket when it got hit by another vehicle. Fall protection remains the bucket railing in the opinion of the aerial lift manufacturers. But what if the worker leans over the railing, what then? Placement is not always conveniently underneath a fluorescent lamp for example for any kind of elevating platform even a scissor lift. The safest thing to do is to warn users not to lean on or over the platform railings and to stay within the platform boundary including one’s hands. On single- person buckets that may seem impossible to do so therefore we begin to introduce fall protection additionally to the railing. How to do it? Engineered fall arrest system, anchor post 5 ft+ in a corner, small SRL, one system for each worker. AND then: test with a steady pull up to MAF yourself because the manufacturers may not help at this time. For more details email J. Nigel Ellis.


Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #11


Tip of the Week No. 239:
Both company and contractor employees should use aerial lifts to position themselves under and reach up to lights and other high areas in foyers instead of relying on use of stepladders or extension ladders. In addition to safe work practices, using proper equipment that helps to engineer out height hazards is a critical cornerstone of a building-management safety commitment.
Excerpt from Chapter 3 – Who Needs Fall Protection? Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


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