Find Out More

Tip of the Week No. 246 – 05/25/09 – Residential Roofs


Residential roof installations should be viewed as opportunities for creative fall protection, particularly using the upper wall studs and cross members as a railing rather than working surface.
This can be accomplished through the use of temporary plywood floors and stepladders.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 255.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 234 – 01/12/09 – Roof maintenance


Wherever routine work on an existing roof occurs, the same fall protection requirements will apply for general industry as for construction.
Repairs and occasional work will usually come under construction regulations.
Window cleaners who are letting down lines or hauling them up must be protected within 6 feet of an edge; they should take advantage of the lifeline attached to its anchor point.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 106.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 232 – 12/22/08 – Parapet Walls


If a parapet wall is less than 900mm (3 feet) in height (i.e., serves as a guardrail), fall arrest protection must be provided whenever the worker approaches within approximately 2m (6.5 feet) of the roof edge.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 216.

This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 224 – 10/20/08 – Residential Roofs


Residential roof installations should be viewed as opportunities for creative fall protection, particularly using the upper wall studs and cross members as a railing rather than a working surface. This can be accomplished through the use of temporary plywood floors and stepladders.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 255.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No.201 – 03/17/08 – Roofs


In the case of flat roofs with slopes of less than 4 in 12, catastropic falls are predictable within 6 feet of a roof edge and are best stopped by fall protection, physical barriers and lifelines.
These devices, when properly installed and maintained, can act automatically to stop such a fall. Use of a monitor who has to react, warn, be heard and then heeded, involves too much time and uncertainty to avert a potential fall.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 104.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 194 – 01/22/08 – Warning Lines


Warning Line:
A barrier erected on a roof to warn workers that they are approaching an uprotected edge or the side of a roof.
The line designates an area that may be worked by qualified workers without conventional fall protection.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd edition” page 437.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 164 – 06/04/07 -Safety Monitoring System


Safety-monitoring systems: OSHA 1926.502(h) defines a safety-monitoring system as follows;
A safety system in which a Competent Person monitors the safety of all workers in an 8-person roofing crew and warns them when it appears to the monitor that they are unaware of a hazard or are acting in an unsafe manner.
The safety monitor must be on the same roof and within visual sighting distance of the employees and must be close enough to verbally communicate with them.
A safety-monitor system is usable on roofs 50 feet or less in width, without a warning line and where mechanical equipment is not being used or stored [1926.500(h)].

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 101.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week. No. 159 – 04/30/07 – Flat Roofs


In the case of flat roofs with slopes less than 4 in 12, catastrophic falls are predictable within 6 feet of a roof edge, and are best stopped by fall protection, physical barriers and lifelines.
These devices, when properly installed and maintained can act automatically to stop a such a fall.
Use of a monitor who has to react, warn, be heard and then heeded, involves too much time and uncertainty to avert a potential fall hazard.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 104.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No.135 – 11/13/06 – Working on Roofs


Roof-edge work (within 12 feet) requires a protected zone for restraint systems. Roof corners can only be addressed through a fall arrest approach with anchor points at least 5 feet high. (Note: OSHA roofing standards state a 6-foot or 10-foot rule, depending upon whether mechanical equipment is being used. The 12-foot guidance is a practical measure adopted by some corporations.)
Parapets or effective perimeter railings are vital, and must be designed in, providing long-term safety for maintenance personnel who will be at the roof edge foreseeably over the life of the building.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 58.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 123 – 08/14/06 – Roofs


In the case of flat roofs with slopes less than 4 in 12, catastrophic falls are predictable within 6 feet of a roof edge, and are best stopped by fall protection, physical barriers and lifelines.
These devices, when properly installed and maintained, can act automatically to stop such a fall. Use of a monitor who has to react, warn, be heard and then heeded, involves too much time and uncertainty to avert a potential fall hazard.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 104.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 30 A – 06/28/04. Roof Work


Whenever routine work on an existing roof occurs, the same fall protection requirements will apply for general industry as for construction.
Repairs and occasional work will usually come under construction regulations.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 106.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 22 A – 05/03/04 Roof Design


Parapets or effective perimeter railings are vital, and must be designed in, providing long-term safety for maintenance personnel who will be at the roof edge foreseeably over the life of the building.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 58.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 56 A – 01/24/05 – Perimeters at roof edges


Where a low-perimeter wall (less than 42 inches) or no parapet exists, fall protection must always be planned for approaching within 6 feet of an edge.
Access to suspended scaffolds from the roof must always be made with the lifeline system fully hooked up and operational when fall hazards exist.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 147.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.
GO EAGLES!!


Tip of the Week No. 79 A – 07/18/05 – Roof Tie Offs


Wrapping lifelines around a rooftop structure – such as pipe or air-conditioner compressor, using it as a form of rigid block or bollard – continues to be a common anchorage practice.
Safety would be enhanced by changing to a more advanced system of permanent, well-identified roof eyebolts or eyepads, locking snaphooks, and eye-spliced rope lifelines for minimum adequacy and reliability.
Horizontal lifelines with shock absorbers are increasing in popularity for roof work.

In particular, tie-off achieved by wrapping a lanyard or lifeline around an angle iron or girder is not a good practice because, unlike a smooth dockside bollard, structural steel has edges that may be sharp enough to cut the lanyard of an unwitting user in the event of a fall (according to a Canadian Standards Association Hazard Alert).

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 360.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 95 A – 12/12/05 – Roof Monitors


Some roofing felts may extend over the edge without being tacked or wrapped.
This could lead to both the worker and monitor being unaware of unstable footing. It could result in a step close to the edge and an immediate fall over the edge.
Even if both monitor and worker are aware of this, it’s an easy fact to forget momentarily. The eye can be deceived when attention is diverted, even briefly.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 102
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 117 – 06/26/06 – Roof Work


When fall protection of any kind is provided, the project’s competent person must periodically instruct workers in the limitations to that system’s effectiveness. This includes parapets, guardrails and lifelines.
Where building roofs and floors have degraded to the point where any nominal load could cuase a collapse or misstep, special requirements apply. For this purpose, any demolition program (removal of any materials, even possibly for maintenance) or work on any roof or exposed floor requires the employer (meaning owner in most cases) presurvey that structure for adequacy in supporting anticipated loads.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 342.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 91 – 12/05/06 – Roofs


According to the present standard, OSHA 1926.502(h), any mechanical equipment used or stored on the roof of a commercial building, which may obscure visibility, produce smoke or fumes, or provide a noise distraction, must have either a warning line between 6 or 10 feet from an edge or a fall arrest system for closer approach to that edge.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 104.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 84 – 09/26/05 – Roofing


Wherever routine work on an existing roof occurs, the same fall protection requirements will apply for general industry as for construction.
Repairs and occasional work will usually come under construction regulations.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 106.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 70 – 05/23/05 – Roof Work


Wherever routine work on an existing roof occurs, the same fall protection requirements will apply for general industry as for construction.
Repairs and occasional work usually will come under construction regulations.

Window cleaners who are letting down lines or hauling them up must be protected within 6 feet of an edge; they should take advantage of the lifeline attached to its anchor point.
The rope-grabbing device can be moved along the lifeline until the worker is in position at the roof edge.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 106.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Safety News Item – 12/04/09 – Two Workers Fall from Top of Cowboys Staduim


Two iron workers doing maintenance work on the icy roof of Cowboy Stadium slipped and fell 50 to 75 feet.

Both workers sustained serious, but not life threatening, injuries as their falls were broken by a parapet. It took rescue crews about 90 minutes to get the injured workers down using baskets, lined and ladders.
Neither worker was wearing or using safety equipment.


Tip of the Week No. 265 – 11/30/09 – Safety Monitoring Systems


Definition: Safety Monitoring System is a system in which a competent person monitors the safety of all employees on a roofing crew and warns them when is appears to the monitor that they are unaware of the hazard or are acting in an unsafe manner.
The competent person must be on the same roof and within visual sight and voice communication of the other employees.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 416.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 280 – 04/19/10 – Roof Edge Work


Roof-edge work (within 12 feet) requires a protected zone for restraint systems. Roof corners can only be addressed through a fall arrest approach with anchor points at least 5 feet high.
(Note: OSHA roofing standards state a 6-foot or 10-foot rule, depending upon whether mechanical equipment is being used. The 12-foot guidance is a practical measure adopted by some corporations.)
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 58.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Please select a category from the list below