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Tip of the Week No. 264 – 11/09/07 – Fall Arrest


There is no need to risk prolonged suspension after a fall arrest when it is possible to use an automatic, controlled descent system. Rather than using equipment that arrests a fall, but also could create the need for a difficult and costly high-level rescue, workers should use a lifeline system that automatically lowers then at a constant rate following a fall-either immediately or under rescuer control, whichever is appropriate.
This is especially advantageous for external applications without obstructions below, and for large confined spaces with a lower (bottom) means of egress, such a generating or recovery boiler.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” apge 143.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 261 – 10/19/09 – Restraints


A restraint is intended to be a leash, reasonably preventing access to a fall-hazard zone. In practice, this is extremely difficult, especially if they system is moved.
It is far better to treat it as a fall arrest system meeting fall arrest requirements. Note that within 6 feet of an edge or opening, a fall hazard can exist if a fall occurs and the restraint system is nonfunctioning or too long.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 141.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 257 – 08/24/09 – Safety Responsibility


It is reasonable to require workers to accept responsibility for their own safety, provided they have been physically trained and mentally prepared, educated in policy, equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and furnished with suitable, identified anchor points as part of an employer’s credible fall protection program.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 54.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 253 – 07/13/09 – Rigging Lifeline Arrangements


Poor work habits, lack of supervision, and a desire by many workers to declare themselves experienced with rigging lifeline arrangements can lead to uses that are unsafe and not recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
Considering the use of mountaineering snaphooks and harnesses in an industrial fall arrest system is a lure few industry people can resist, usually because of attractive, lightweight, low-cost designs. However, it is potentially dangerous to consider equipment components that have not been designed into an industrial fall equipment system and approved as such by a competent supplier.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 187.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 252 – 07/06/09 – Fall Arrest


Fall arrest is designed to “catch” a person once he or she has falls, whereas restraint systems are designed to keep the free fall from occurring in the first place. If restraint becomes leaning, a body support becomes work positioning and, when it is used for leaning, the worker is off balance.
If this work method is an eventuality, additional fall protection is then required.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 141.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 251 – 06/29/09 – Foreseeable Fall Hazards


Designers, engineering consultants ,design-builders, architects/engineers, suppliers, construction managers, superintendents and knowledgeable owners must realize that they create the work environment and thus its foreseeable fall hazards.
They, more than anyone else, need to apply the proper knowledge and training to the project to address fall hazards in advance. It’s time that a formal fall protection plan accompany each project, with awareness by the designer of how fall hazards can be dealt with effectively.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” pages 339-340.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 247 – 06/01/09 – FP System Limits


When fall protection of any kind is provided, the project’s Competent Person must periodically instruct workers in the limitations to that system’s effectiveness.
This includes parapets, guardrails and lifelines. Where building roofs and floors have degraded to the point where any nominal load could cause a collapse or misstep, special requirements apply.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 342.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 229 – 11/24/08 – Safety Monitor


It is common for a safety monitor to wear a bright vest or other distinctive clothing to broadcast his or her role as a monitor.
The biggest danger a monitor faces is being distracted, so that persons within 6 feet of a fall hazard are not cautioned precisely at the moment of impending hazard. It is at these moments that the safety-monitor program fails, and management must depend upon barriers, warning lines and fall arrest sytems properly applied.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 126.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 227 – 11/10/08 – Fall Protection Systems


The design of fall protection systems must also take into account the need for periodic inspection and maintenance. Appropriate materials should be specified for the environment, and system components should be readily accessible for routine checks.
Engineers also must make sure that additional hazards in using personal fall protection equipment are not introduced (e.g., swing falls are of particular concern with self-retracting lanyards).

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 61.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 226 – 11/03/08 – Fall Protection Systems


Fall Protection on:
* the same level requires the elimination of fall hazards through means such as adequate slip resistance, housekeeping and removal of tripping hazards.
* stairs involves the uniformity of the steps and graspable stair rails that are consistently used.
* ladder and roofs is best left to professionals.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 2.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 223 – 10/13/08 – First Worker Up


A first-worker-up, portable climbing system consists of a shepherd hook on a pole, which incorporates a retracting lifeline or rope grab, and can be pushed up to snag structural members.
After climbing approximately 18 to 20 feet, the climber belts-off before pushing the pole further up the tower.
Portable systems can be used safely if they are practical and if the users avoid contacting electrical conductors. Systems with dielectric properties should be tested by the owner under the conditions of use.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 247.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 210 – 06/16/08 – Fall Arrest


Fall arrest is designed to “catch” a person once he or she fall, whereas restraint systems are designed to keep the free fall from occurring in the first place.
It is far better to treat it as a fall arrest system meeting fall arrest requirements.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 141.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 205 – 04/21/08 – Fall Programs


Experience shows that a serious or fatal injury occurs an average of every two to three years in companies where workers are regularly exposed to elevated fall hazards. Although this number may seem low relative to other injuries, the severity of fall incidents is usually very high and typically produces lifelong consequences.
The cost of instituting a comprehensive fall protection program is negligible in comparison to the economic benefits an employer receives. Because the severity of a single fall incident is so high, whatever the existing general insurance and compensation insurance program coverage, relief from the crippling costs of fall disabilities and death benefits should be immediate. With fewer or no elevated falls, there will be fewer payouts and fewer lost workdays, both of which translate into increased productivity.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 310-311.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 199 – 03/03/08 – Restraint/Positioning Suspension


Restraint/Positioning Suspension:
What is commonly referred to as fall protection may rather be a means of restraint that prevents a worker from reaching an edge, or a means of support necessary to complete the work task.
Equipment (a lineman’s belt and pole strap, a rebar belt with rebar hook assembly) is designed to enable workers to position themselves to prevent a fall from occurring.
Since this usually involves moving or repositioning the equipment, an independent backup lifeline should be considered. Any time a worker’s balance is substituted by belt and lines, a backup fall arrest system is needed.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 241.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 198 – 02/18/08 – Swing Falls


Swing falls can be controlled in at least two ways.
First, using an appropriate horizontal lifeline can help maintain the attachment point overhead, thereby allowing the fall arrest to occur in a vertical plane.
Second, raising the height of th anchor point can reduce the angle of the arc and teh force of the swing.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 183.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 197 – 02/11/08 – Fall Protection Systems


Overall, establishment of an engineering policy to specify fall protection systems that limit arresting forces to an average of 650 pounds is recommended.
Yet each system also must be detailed to suit a specific work method. Workers should have reasonably easy and protected work access and suitable fall arrest equipment must be available.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 60.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 192 – 01/07/08- Continuous Fall Protection


Continuous Fall Protection:
The design and use of a fall protection system so that fall hazard controls are being used or no exposure to an elevated fall hazard occurs.
This may require more than one fall protection system or a combination of prevention or protection measures.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 426.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 169 – 07/16/07 – 100% Fall Protection


Achieving 100% fall protection begins by planning the specific work methods through a collaborative effort among managers, foremen and workers.
This should minimally include analysis of the work task, including travel to and from the worksite and the proper selection of equipment, supplemented by initial and ongoing training, knowledgeable supervision and regular maintenance.
In other words, 100% fall protection can be achieved through a complete systems approach to each potential exposure before work begins.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” pages 302-303.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 165 – 06/11/07 – Safety Rules for General Industry FP Planning


Safety Rules for General Industry Fall Protection Planning:
*Do not use guardrails as anchorages unless approved by engineering.
*Never use pipe vents as anchorages.
*Do not allow knotted systems for fall arrest or fall anchorage attachments.
*Teach tie-backs for both scaffold suspension and lifelines.
*Require building managers to install permanent roof anchors.
*Require footpaths and catwalks for main, permitted routes of travel on roofs, especially those with no or low parapets.
*Require permanent warning lines at 6 to 10 feet from the edge of a roof with no or low parapets.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 312.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 154 – 03/26/07 – Scaffolds


Scaffold manufacturers should provide gates for platform access and outline fall protection methods during erectins in their instructions.
Scissors lift manufacturers, recognizing that workers may use the midrailings as a ladder rung to reach up to and in between an obstruction, may decide that a grating or mesh could be installed to limit this fall-exposure tendency.
However, it also makes sense for manufacturers to specify personal fall protection for overreaching or leaning over guardrails.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 150 – 02/26/07 – Last Worker Down/First Worker Up


Similarly, the last worker down, having detached the fall arrest equipment, also is exposed to a fall hazard.
Protection can sometimes be achieved by threading ropes through suitabley rounded shackles. This way, the end of the lifeline accessible at ground level can be used to pull the rope through when the work is complete.
Alternatively, if the structure will be climbed in the future for maintenance, a permanent climbing system should be installed. Then the last worker down can use this system to remove temporary equipment before making the final descent.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 61.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Safety News Item – 02/02/07 – Dr. Ellis addresses tough fall protection issue


Dr. J. Nigel Ellis and Ellis Fall Safety Solutions has been hired to assist an international corporation deal atough fall protection faced by its workers face.
These workers need to gain access equipment, sometimes at heights, in both private and corporate facilities. Because each building if different and the location of the equipment is individual to each facility the workers can face a multitude of fall protection situations, some that had not previously been anticipated. This requires the workers to be equipped with a versatile and varied array of possible fall protection solutions.
Dr. Ellis and EFSS has been retained to help develope a practical “fall protection equipment kit” that the workers can carry to all jobs and feel secure that that will have a solution to the vast majority of fall protection situations that can arise in any given work week.


Safety News Item- 09/01/06 – Miller Fall Protection Opens New Site


The Miller Fall Protection division of Bacou-Dalloz recently opened its new facility in Franklin, PA. The new facility doubled the previous space and allows for expansion of the non-manufacturing aspects of the company.
Besides being a manufacturing site for Miller fall protection equipment, this facility also provides state-of-the art capabilities for research and development, in-house testing for standards compliance and training.


Tip of the Week No. 6 A – 01/12/04 FP programs


The proper selection and purchase of safety equipment alone does not constitute a fall protection program. A complete, effective (written) program will ensure that equipment is used and maintained properly. Such a program requires that:
1. appropriate anchorage points are established by the employer;
2. proper inspection and maintenance procedures are developed and carried out according to manufacturers’ instructions; and
3. workers are observed, trained and supervised regularly in proper application and use.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 154.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 104 A – 03/06/06 – Fall Arrest


Fall arrest is designed to “catch” a person once he or she falls, whereas restraint systems are designed to keep the free fall from occurring in the first place.
If restraint becomes leaning, a body support becomes work positioning and, when it is used for leaning, the worker is off balance. If this work method is an eventuality, additional fall protection is then required.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 141.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 21 A – 04/26/04 100% FP


Construction projects using a fall protection policy requiring 100% fall protection have shown an average of 35% labor savings and lower material-handling costs due to planning efficiencies.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 311.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 24 A – 05/17/04 Rail Systems


The advantages of rail-type (climbing protection) systems are easy inspection, low-cost maintenance and the fact that they allow several workers to climb at the same time. Structural attachments every few feet make these systems inherently more reliable and maintenance-free than cable-type climbing protection, which depends on a single, upper fixture point.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 250.
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Tip of the Week No. 67 A – 04/18/05 – FP near Edges


A fall protection system should be in continuous use whenever a worker is close to an unprotected edge, such as in the following situation:
Any unprotected side where the height of a vertical barrier – 30 inches minimum – plus the depth of the barrier’s top edge is less than 48 inches it total distance.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 107.
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Tip of the Week No. 82 A – 08/15/05 – 100% FP


If we start with the objective of 100 percent protection and then work toward that goal, it will be achieved.
The effectiveness of protection is usually dependent on the degree of planning that occurs before the job begins.
Fall incidents should decrease in proportion to the planning commitment.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” pages 301-302.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 93 A – 11/28/05 – Planning


The aim of an effective fall protection program is to increase the investment in planning elevated work and to teach and observe workers in safe methods.
This will result in fewer fall victims and shrink the losses from workers’ compensation payout and third-party liability suits or subrogation.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 20.
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Tip of the Week No. 97 A – 01/01/06 – FP Systems


If a fall hazard cannot be eliminated or fall prevention assured, effective fall protection means should be planned, implemented and carefully monitored to control risks of personnel injury due to falling.
Fall protection systems shall be continuous by design and supervision shall control against their intermittent or improper use.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 405.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 118- 07/03/06 – Fall Protection Procedures


A person’s balance should be backed up with a positive, effective means of fall protection. This means that administrative procedures should seldom be used alone.
Good fall protection control calls for a prioritized system to tackle foreseeable fall hazards.
Sometimes used in combination, the following hierarchy is in order of importance:
1. Eliminating fall hazards
2. Preventing fall hazards by guarding
3.Arresting falls
4.Applying administrative techniques

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 20.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Safety News Item – 06/09/06 – Fall Protection for Car Carriers/Autocarriers/Car Transporters


Fall Protection for car carrier drivers is a safety issue that long has been ignored.
Dr. J. Nigel Ellis is on the forefront of developing fall protection systems that provide the necessary safety while not interfering with the tasks of the driver.
Go to the rotating images on our FallSafety Homepage to see sketches of Dr. Ellis’ Railgrabber concept.

For more information or to talk to Dr. Ellis about your car carrier fall protection concerns contact us at 800-372-7775 or email at dsc@FallSafety.com.


Safety News Item – 04/08/06 – FP Netting Article


The March 2006 issue of Occupational Health & Safety Magazine (both print and online) includes an article about using netting in conjunction with other fall protection devices or systems for maximum fall protection in construction projects.

To read the article click here OS&H Netting Article. Then go to March “06 and click on “Know your Netting”.

To find out more about netting systems go to the Ellis Ladder Improvements, Inc section of our web site and click on Baynet.


Tip of the Week No. 102 – 02/27/06 – Tying Off


Tying off, as it appears in standards as well as in company policies and rules, has lulled principals, contractors, and employees into feeling comfortable with this partial form of safety.

A tie-off fall protection program also gives a company a false sense of security because managers believe fall hazards have been fully addressed and workers simply use what is given to them.

In essence, the assertion that fall hazards have been addressed is only a misguided notion.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 293.
This book is an invaluable resource for every safety manager’s library. Click here to find out about ordering a copy. Order online now.


Safety News Item – 12/14/05 – New FP for Car Carriers


Dr. J. Nigel Ellis had applied for a patent in the area of fall protection for auto carrier/car carrier/ car transporter driver/operators.The new system can be upgraded to several fall arrest systems. This follows an upturn in death and injury of operators where no edge protection exists.Presently required by OSHA in their 29 CFR 1917 regulations, the 5(a)(1) citation with support for 1910.132 PPE and 1910.23(c) trigger height of 4 feet.The patent follows the 3 point control directed by 49 CFR 399 for the safety and health of truck drivers.Systems are for new carriers or retrofit by authorized dealer and manufacturers.Click here to download sketches.

December 2005.


Tip of the Week No. 74 – 06/27/05 – FP for roofing


When considerating a fall protection system for roofing, it is extremely important to realize that each building is unique and requires a site-specific plan for identification of the roofing fall hazards.
For example, if a hot asphalt, built-up roofing system is specified for a building with no parapet walls, a personal fall arrest system is not feasible. The asphalt would immediately damage any lanyards or harnesses that contact the material, unless an anchorage point is designated to keep the lanyard or harness from contacting the hot asphalt.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 254.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Safety News Item – 04/29/05 – Fall Protection Policy Changes


Kentucky and Utah state workplace safety agencies have decided to reject and no longer follow the OSHA 1999 Interim Fall Protection Compliance Guidelines for Residential Construction as they pertain to alternate procedures.

The OSHA Interim Fall Protection Guidelines allow employers in some residential construction activities to use alternative procedures instead of conventional fall protection.
The OSHA Interim Fall Protection Guidelines do not require a showing of infeasibility of the conventional procedures and while a fall protection plan is required, it does not have to be written nor specific to the work site.

In February 2005 Kentucky reverted back to the original federal guidelines, as cited in its standards, requiring a demonstration of infeasibility of conventional fall protection systems as well as requiring a site specific fall protection plan.

In December 2004 Utah announced that it would no longer enforce the Interim Fall Protection Guidelines “due to improvements in the availability of higher protection in the construction industry…”


Tip of the Week No. 66 – 04/25/05 – FP as work tool


Never use fall protection equipment as a work tool unless your equipment is specifically designed for work positioning.
If it is used, for example, to lean back on, you must have a fall arrest system in addition to work-positioning equipment.
Sometimes harnesses can incorporate features for fall arrest and work positioning that do not conflict in their separate uses.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 323.
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Safety News Item – 04/22/05 – FP for Silo Construction


OSHA Procedure Instruction Letter (no. I05-V-2) was effective on March 21, 2005 concerning Fall Protection during Concrete Storage Silo Construction.

This PIL sets forth the various applicable standards for the different aspects of fall protection during the construction of concrete silos.

To read the complete PIL go to PIL I05-V-2.


Tip of the Week No. 65 – 04/18/05 – Fall Protection System


A fall protection system should be in continuous use whenever a worker is close to an edge, such as in the following situation:
Any unprotected side – for example; with a barrier, such as a railing or parapet, zero to 30 inches in height, or incapable of supporting a downward load of 200 pounds, with minimal sag under load.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection ,3rd Edition” page 107.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No.47 – 11/15/04 – Tank fall protection.


Tank manufacturers need to address maintenance work methods with practical access and fall protection. Tank and vessel manufacturers must be sure to design manways greater than 18 inches in diameter to avoid trapping both workers and rescuers; a 24-inch minimum should be considered.
In particular, maintainers of digester tanks in the pulp industry should have access systems specified in instructions and should recommend practical fall protection and emergency retrieval systems.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 64.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 41 – 10/04/04. Preplanning tasks.


Classifying related work tasks, particularly in terms of their required mobility, can facilitate preplanning of anchor points, foreseeing maintenance, and determining environmental or facility influences.
For example, the methods for entering vertical confined spaces may be similar in storage tanks, process vessels, vaults or sewers.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 305.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No.37 – 08/30/04. Safety programs.


Each contractor should have a written safety program outlining the policy, training and maintenance procedures. All equipment should be live-tested under controlled conditions to realistically simulate potential problems.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 148.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 36 – 08/23/04 – Safety Programs


Behavior-based safety programs can help organizations to recognize, identify and document potential fall hazards, but this can only be successful if management lives up to a committment to eliminate or counter those fall hazards within a reasonable time period.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 247.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 35 – 08/16/04. Fall Elimination.


Eliminating fall hazards means finding a way to avoid the necessity of exposure to heights.
This is the number one goal of fall protection. If a hazard is eliminated, then workers are not put at risk.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 20.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 34 – 08/09/04. Fall Arrest Systems.


No component of a fall arrest system should be substituted or changed unless fully evaluated and tested by a Competent Person or the equipment manufacturer. Large corporations with fall protection audit committees should make it a priority to have on board a Competent Person familiar with the technical details of mixing and matching equipment. Not only should standards such as ANSI Z359.1-1992 be followed, but also individual components must be tested in-house for expected methods of use.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 187.
How about ordering a copy for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 24 – 05/24/04. Fall protection program.


The proper selection and purchase of safety equipment alone does not constitute a fall protection program. A complete, effective (written) program will ensure that equipment is used and maintained properly. Such a program requires that:
1. appropriate anchorage points are established by the employer;
2. proper inspection and maintenance procedures are developed and carried out according to manufacturers’ instructions; and
3. workers are observed, trained, and supervised regularly in proper application and use.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 154.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 21 – 05/03/04. Workers and Fall Protection.


What do workers say (about fall protection)?
1. Falls are a problem in the workplace.
2. More fall protection should be used – we see it in government jobs and the apprentice programs.
3. They’ll protect equipment from falling with debris nets, but not people with personnel nets.
4. Management says it costs 25% more if we use lifelines.
5. I’d get fired if I insist on fall protection.
6. I never thought about it.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 69.
How about ordering a copy of for yourself? Order online now.


Tip of the Week No. 18 – 04/12/04. Prevention.


The search for fall prevention is also the domain of the architect/engineer. Fall prevention is the use of permanent platforms and stairs for access, with suitable guardrails. Some structures – light poles, for instance – call for temporary platform access.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 319.
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Tip of the Week No. 7 – 01/26/04. Design.


The purpose of industrial safety standards is to provide design and performance guidelines for equipment that can be used for fall protection. The purpose of regulation is to require the use of fall protection generally or in specific industries.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 31.
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Tip of the Week No. 5 – 01/05/04. Fall Arrest.


Arresting falls is the end result of the proper use of fall arrest equipment, such as safety nets and personal protective equipment (fall arresters), where there is sufficient clearance from a lower level.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 22.
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Tip of the Week No. 4 – 12/29/03. Safety First.


“If it can’t be done safely, we won’t do it!” is a work slogan followed by Dow Chemical, Alcoa and Air Products, three progressive organizations.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 40.
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Tip of the Week No. 2 – 12/15/03. Prevention.


Preventing fall hazards means providing same-level barriers, such as floors, walls, covers, guardrails, handrails and perimeter cables.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” – page 22.
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Tip of the Week No. 1 – 12/08/03. Elimination


Eliminating fall hazards means finding a way to avoid the necessity of exposure to heights. This is the number one goal of fall protection.

See Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition page 20
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Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #1


Tip of the Week No. 319:
Don’t expect a saddle belt to be suitable for fall protection unless the manufacturer states that it is. Also, don’t expect a snaphook to be functional when attached to an angle-iron edge, bolt hole, eye-bolt or small D-ring. And don’t expect a lineman’s or tree trimmer’s belt and strap lanyard to provide dynamic fall protection, other than static support around a pole above a step or brace, or where crotched and around an up-branch or leader. (ANSI 1982).
The purchaser must match the fall protection or work-positioning system with the application, and the worker must use it appropriately (a result of diligent training and work observation).
Excerpt from Chapter Six – Active Fall Protection Systems from the upcoming “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition”. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #14


Tip of the Week No. 242:
In summary, the acid test for the manager is that the fall protection process/system will, as much as reasonably possible, eliminate or minimize all fall hazards in the job.
If you follow the grid of hazard recognition you will more than likely arrive at two or more solutions which can broaden the scope of protection across various job phases.
Excerpt from Chapter 3 – Who Needs Fall Protection? Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #16


Tip of the Week No. 244:
A variety of equipment is available to help employers set up an effective fall protection program. Generally, this includes nets; body-support mechanisms; restraint devices; climbing protection systems; vertical and horzontal lifeline systems; confined entry and retrieval systems; and emergency escape, controlled descent systems.
Excerpt from Chapter 6 – Active Fall Protection Systems. Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #40


Tip of the Week No. 268:
Three-dimensional fall protection for access to high machinery has also been introduced. This consists of lightweight bridge riding on tracks that allows SRLs to be positioned over a hazard. Horizontal cables and rails have also been used on applications from railroad tank cars to edges of buildings.
Excerpt from Chapter 10 – Equipment Selection, Inspection and Maintenance. Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition #48


Tip of the Week No. 276:
Systems are typically engineered into the workplace based upon solid reproducible manufacturer test results and structural engineering drawings. Only one system per worker is required or necessary, provided the system is maintained. But there may be two co-existing methods depending on work sequence and multiple trade needs.
Excerpt from Chapter 10 – Equipment Selections, Inspection, and Maintenance; Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition. Watch this website for more information about the publication date and how you can order your copy.


Tip of the Week 328 – 09/03/2012 – Safety Policy


The knowledgeable owner and/or controlling contractor must set safety policy that permits the safety department to make reasonable rules on fall protection that must be followed in work practice. Construction managers must be required to enforce the safety rules as part of their job requirements. It is the chief operating officer’s job to ensure that this is done in a formal way.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 76.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introductionto Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 269 – 01/25/10 – Fall Protection Systems Engineering


The job of the engineer has traditionally been to design to keep structures up. Now it is also the job of the engineer to keep the people up for construction, maintenance and demolition.
The quality of a single fall arrest anchorage is the benchmark for a fall protection program.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 201.


Tip of the Week No. 276 – 03/15/10 – Cable Systems


Cable Systems:
The advantages of cabe-type systems are their low cost and simple fixture to the brackets at the top and bottom of the climbing structure.
Their disadvantages center on the questionable reliability of a single, upper fixture point and the weathering properties of steel cable outdoors, which can also affect the performance of sliding devices.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 249.
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Tip of the Week No. 315 – 04/04/2011 – Synthetic Cables


Synthetic cables with inherent elasticity can simplify overhead installation. Moreover, they enable the connecting means, particularly fall arrester devices, to remain overhead when walking the entire span. Lenghts of up to 200 feet between supports are possible for up to three workers. Suitable areas include piperacks, roofs and railcar/tankcar loading and unloading docks.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 3rd Edition” page 179.
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Tip of the Week No. 322 – 06/25/2012 – Designing out Hazards


Ultimately, the owner (as principal) is responsible for limiting or excluding fall hazards from his or her property. Both reputation and pocketbook are at stake. While the knowledgeable owner may employ architects and engineering consultants to advise about the construction of a building or structure, the owner must clearly require state-of-the-art, designed, safety features such as parapets, guardrails, and permanent anchorages wherever possible, both for contractor employees and for his or her own workers, and foreseeable access accommodation following construction.

See Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition page 74.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 325 – 08/13/2012 – Pneumatic Function


A manual operation should back-up the pneumatic function. A torque limiter (max. 450-lb. slip force) should be applied to all electrical or pneumatic, personal lifting operations to keep the full force of the power source plus mechanical advantage from causing damage to the worker or property (ANSI Z117).

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 371.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 331 – 09/24/2012 – Integrated FP Design


It is best to integrate fall protection within a structure at the time the structure itself is designed. In some cases the choice of manufactured system components, such as pulleys, trolleys, and other devices, may reduce the need for basic engineering. The expensive testing you need may have already been conducted and is often available from the manufacturer.

See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 290.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introductionto Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 334 – 10/15/2012 – Passive Fall Protection Systems


Passive fall protection devices are often used for workers who must access the top of trailers or rail cars. These systems consist of a gangway and cage that descend to provide a safe access, and a guardrail that surrounds the working area of the top of the trailer or rail car. The systems must be inspected regularly to make sure that they are functioning correctly. If the spring setting or excessive wear and tear allows the cage to rise up while in use, or if any opening around the cage exceeds 19 inches between the cage railing and the top of the trailer or rail car, then the workers must be protected from falling by another method, such as a horizontal lifeline system, until repairs can be made to the passive fall protection system.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” pages 352-353.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introductionto Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 340 – 11/26/2012- Permanent Lifeline Systems


Permanent horizontal lifeline systems should be designed to last as long as the structure to which they are attached. They can consist of 1/4 inch-by-1/2-inch, rigid horizontal rail or cable that allows a lightweight trolley or pulley to slide easily with the worker.
Since these are attached to the structure at regular intervals, the rail/cable system can accommodate several workers simultaneously (one trolley per worker). Special sections can allow the trolley to go continuously around corners so workers do not have to disconnect. The fixed rail trolley can be easily attached and detached at protected access/egress points.
See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 239.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introductionto Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


Tip of the Week No. 352 – 02/25/2013 – Managed Fall Protection Programs


Any company that has employees who are potentially exposed to fall hazards should have a written comprehensive managed fall protection program. This program is important because it established guidelines and requirements to protect those employees and contractors who are exposed to potential falls while working at elevation. See “Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition” page 378.
Introduction to Fall Protection, 4th Edition now available for purchase. To order your copy call 1-800-372-7775 or order online at Introductionto Fall Protection, 4th Edition Orders.


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